COVID-19 RESPONSE

The content of this page has been referenced from the GOV.UK website:

Guidance | Domestic abuse: recognise the signs | Published 26 June 2020

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-abuse-recognise-the-signs/domestic-abuse-recognise-the-signs#how-to-recognise-domestic-abuse-in-a-relationship

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and domestic abuse

The government acknowledges that coronavirus household isolation instructions can cause anxiety for those who are experiencing or feel at risk of domestic abuse. There is never an excuse for domestic abuse, no matter what the circumstances are.

Household isolation instructions as a result of coronavirus do not apply if you need to leave your home to escape domestic abuse.

If you feel at risk of abuse, there is help and support available to you, including the police, online support, helplines and refuges. You can find more information about these and other services on this page.

Recognise domestic abuse

Anyone can be a victim of domestic abuse, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity, socio-economic status, sexuality or background.

What is domestic abuse?

Domestic abuse is not always physical violence. It can also include:

  • coercive control and ‘gaslighting’

  • economic abuse

  • online abuse

  • threats and intimidation

  • emotional abuse

  • sexual abuse

What signs to look for

If you believe that you or someone else could be a victim of domestic abuse, there are signs that you can look out for including:

  • being withdrawn, or being isolated from family and friends

  • having bruises, burns or bite marks

  • having finances controlled, or not being given enough to buy food or pay bills

  • not being allowed to leave the house, or stopped from going to college or work

  • having your internet or social media use monitored, or someone else reading your texts, emails or letters

  • being repeatedly belittled, put down or told you are worthless

  • being pressured into sex

  • being told that abuse is your fault, or that you’re overreacting

 

See more signs to look for.

Support a friend if they’re being abused

Let them know you’ve noticed something is wrong.

If someone confides in you, there is more information on how to support a friend who is being abused.

If you are worried that someone you know is a victim of domestic abuse, you can call Refuge’s National Domestic Abuse Helpline for free, confidential support, 24 hours a day on 0808 2000 247. Visit the helpline website to access information on how to support a friend.

If you believe there is an immediate risk of harm to someone, or it is an emergency, always call 999.

Report it

If you, or someone you know, is a victim of domestic abuse find out how to report domestic abuse.

If you are in immediate danger, call 999 and ask for the police.

If you are in danger and unable to talk on the phone, call 999 and listen to the questions from the operator and, if you can, respond by coughing or tapping on the handset.

Call 999 from a mobile

If prompted, press 55 to Make Yourself Heard and this will transfer your call to the police.

Pressing 55 only works on mobiles and does not allow police to track your location.

Call 999 from a landline

If the operator can only hear background noise and cannot decide whether an emergency service is needed, you will be connected to a police call handler.

If you replace the handset, the landline may remain connected for 45 seconds in case you pick up again.

When 999 calls are made from landlines, information about your location should be automatically available to the call handlers to help provide a response.

Copyright 2020

Kiran Support Services